October 2022 Programming on the Criterion Channel Announced

October 2022 Programming on the Criterion Channel Announced

Each month, the programmers at the Criterion Channel produce incredible line-ups for their subscribers. For October, the Channel will feature films from Ishiro Honda, Tsai Ming-liang, Kathryn Bigelow, and more!

Below you’ll find the programming schedule for the month, along with a complete list of titles that Criterion has in store for us. Don’t forget to check the Criterion Channel’s main page regularly though, as they occasionally will drop surprises that aren’t included in the official press release.

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Premiering October 1

October 2022 Programming on the Criterion Channel Announced

’80s Horror

The 1980s were defined by style and excess, and the era’s horror movies were no exception. Innovations in practical effects made the nightmares more vivid than ever, and thanks to the rise of home video, the call was now coming from inside the house. While established talents such as John Carpenter (Prince of Darkness), Tobe Hooper (The Funhouse), David Cronenberg (Scanners), Michael Mann (The Keep), and Paul Schrader (Cat People) brought terrifying spectacles to the screen, often with the help of Hollywood studios, home video opened up a new market that allowed the independents to take the genre to unexpected and—in the case of the UK’s censorship of infamous “Video Nasties”—controversial new heights. Curated by Clyde Folley, this ghastly tour through the decade of greed features ambitious art-pulp hybrids (White of the Eye), a Hitchcock-inspired trucker movie (Road Games), old-fashioned creature features (Q: The Winged Serpent), a vampiric Nicolas Cage (Vampire’s Kiss), and absolutely unclassifiable cult oddities (Society), bringing together some of the eighties’ most stylish, haunting, and outrageous visions.

  • Inferno, Dario Argento, 1980
  • The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Miss Osbourne, Walerian Borowczyk, 1981
  • Dead & Buried, Gary Sherman, 1981
  • The House by the Cemetery, Lucio Fulci, 1981
  • The Funhouse, Tobe Hooper, 1981
  • Strange Behavior, Michael Laughlin, 1981
  • Wolfen, Michael Wadleigh, 1981
  • Scanners, David Cronenberg, 1981
  • Road Games, Richard Franklin, 1981
  • The Fan, Ed Bianchi, 1981
  • Basket Case, Frank Henenlotter, 1982
  • Next of Kin, Tony Williams, 1982
  • Cat People, Paul Schrader, 1982
  • Q: The Winged Serpent, Larry Cohen, 1982
  • The Slumber Party Massacre, Amy Holden Jones, 1982
  • The Keep, Michael Mann, 1983
  • The Hunger, Tony Scott, 1983*
  • Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, John McNaughton, 1986
  • The Hidden, Jack Sholder, 1987
  • Prince of Darkness, John Carpenter, 1987
  • White of the Eye, Donald Cammell, 1987
  • Near Dark, Kathryn Bigelow, 1987
  • The Vanishing, George Sluizer, 1988
  • Brain Damage, Frank Henenlotter, 1988
  • Dream Demon, Harley Cokeliss, 1988
  • The Blob, Chuck Russell, 1988
  • The Lair of the White Worm, Ken Russell, 1988
  • Vampire’s Kiss, Robert Bierman, 1989
  • Society, Brian Yuzna, 1989
  • Tetsuo: The Iron Man, Shinya Tsukamoto, 1989

*Available November 1

Vampires

Scary yet seductive, the vampire has inspired more fascination than just about any other creature in horror history. Ever since Bela Lugosi set the standard for sinister sophistication with his iconic performance in Tod Browning’s 1931 classic Dracula, filmmakers have been relentlessly reimagining and redefining the vampire myth as a delivery system for primal fear, edgy eroticism, and potent social commentary. Glam lesbian vamps (Daughters of Darkness), blaxploitation bloodsuckers (Blacula), pint-size Nordic Nosferatus (Let the Right One In), K-horror creeps (Thirst), and more are now all part of an ever-growing, multinational lore that will, truly, never die.

  • Dracula, Tod Browning, 1931
  • Dracula (Spanish-language version), George Melford, 1931
  • Vampyr, Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1932
  • Isle of the Dead, Mark Robson, 1945
  • The Velvet Vampire, Stephanie Rothman, 1971
  • Daughters of Darkness, Harry Kümel, 1971
  • Blacula, William Crain, 1972
  • Nosferatu the Vampyre, Werner Herzog, 1979
  • Fascination, Jean Rollin, 1979
  • The Living Dead Girl, Jean Rollin, 1982
  • The Hunger, Tony Scott, 1983*
  • Near Dark, Kathryn Bigelow, 1987
  • Vampire’s Kiss, Robert Bierman, 1988
  • Cronos, Guillermo del Toro, 1993
  • Blood & Donuts, Holly Dale, 1995
  • Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary, Guy Maddin, 2002
  • Let the Right One In, Tomas Alfredson, 2008
  • Thirst, Park Chan-wook, 2009
  • A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014

*Available November 1

Universal Horror Classics

Dracula, Frankenstein, the Mummy, and the Invisible Man: some of the most legendary movie monsters of all time originated at Universal Pictures in the 1930s, when the studio produced a string of gothic horror classics that would shape the development of the genre for decades to come. Featuring pioneering special effects and makeup, atmospheric mise-en-scène influenced by German expressionism, and unforgettable stars like Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi, these classic chillers have left an enduring mark upon the collective cultural imagination.

  • Dracula, Tod Browning, 1931
  • Dracula (Spanish-language version), George Melford, 1931
  • Frankenstein, James Whale, 1931
  • The Mummy, Karl Freund, 1932
  • The Invisible Man, James Whale, 1933
  • The Black Cat, Edgar G. Ulmer, 1934
  • Bride of Frankenstein, James Whale, 1935
  • The Raven, Lew Landers, 1935
  • Creature from the Black Lagoon, Jack Arnold, 1954

Ishiro Honda: King of the Monsters

Featuring an appreciation by filmmaker Alex Cox

The man who gave the world Godzilla, Rodan, Mothra, and more, Ishiro Honda was the wizard behind the Japanese monster-movie (kaiju eiga) craze that thrilled legions of international fans in the 1950s and ’60s. Turning the trauma of nuclear attack into larger-than-life pop spectacle, Honda created ferociously entertaining special-effects extravaganzas that doubled as resonant metaphors for the devastation of World War II. This tribute to Honda’s ever-imaginative artistry features the creature features for which he is best remembered as well as lesser-known cult favorites like the psychedelic horror freakout Matango.

  • Godzilla, 1954
  • Godzilla, King of the Monsters, 1956
  • Rodan, 1956
  • The Mysterians, 1957
  • Varan the Unbelievable, 1958
  • Atragon, 1963
  • Matango, 1963
  • Dogora, 1964
  • Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster, 1964
  • Mothra vs. Godzilla, 1964
  • Frankenstein vs. Baragon, 1965
  • Invasion of Astro-Monster, 1965
  • The War of the Gargantuas, 1966
  • Destroy All Monsters, 1968
  • All Monsters Attack, 1969
  • Space Amoeba, 1970
  • Terror of Mechagodzilla, 1975

Premiering October 15

Ari Aster’s Adventures in Moviegoing

With the indelibly disturbing nightmares Hereditary and Midsommar, Ari Aster has already established himself as one of twenty-first-century horror cinema’s most audacious auteurs. In this edition of Adventures in Moviegoing, Aster sits down to discuss the unforgettable films that have shaped his life and work. Many of his choices—including Julien Duvivier’s moody noir Panique, the twisted psychological shocker Lady in a Cage, and Lucrecia Martel’s unnerving mystery The Headless Woman—quiver with the same sense of dread that runs through Aster’s own work.

  • Panique, Julien Duvivier, 1946
  • Hobson’s Choice, David Lean, 1954
  • Sansho the Bailiff, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1954
  • Hiroshima mon amour, Alain Resnais, 1959
  • Lady in a Cage, Walter Grauman, 1964
  • The Homecoming, Peter Hall, 1973
  • Autumn Sonata, Ingmar Bergman, 1978
  • Black Book, Paul Verhoeven, 2006
  • The Headless Woman, Lucrecia Martel, 2009
  • Another Year, Mike Leigh, 2010*
  • Beyond the Hills, Cristian Mungiu, 2012

*Available November 1

Exclusive Streaming Premieres

Saturday, October 1

Vive l’amour

The sophomore feature from Tsai Ming-liang finds the acclaimed master of Taiwan’s Second New Wave demonstrating a confident new cinematic voice. Vive l’amour follows three characters unknowingly sharing a supposedly empty Taipei apartment. The beautiful realtor May Lin (Yang Kuei-mei) brings her lover Ah-jung (Chen Chao-jung) to a vacant unit she has on the market, unaware that it is secretly being occupied by the suicidal Hsiao-kang (Lee Kang-sheng). The three cross paths in a series of precisely staged, tragicomic erotic encounters, but despite their physical proximity, they find themselves no closer to a personal connection. Featuring an intoxicating mix of longing and deadpan humor, Vive l’amour catapulted Tsai to the top of the international filmmaking world and earned him the prestigious Golden Lion at the 1994 Venice International Film Festival.

Saturday, October 1

still/here

A masterpiece of American avant-garde cinema, Christopher Harris’s 2000 thesis film is a haunting record of the crumbling, eerily depopulated landscapes of St. Louis’s north side, an area almost exclusively inhabited by working-class and working-poor African Americans. Shooting in evocatively ghostly black-and-white 16 mm, Harris crafts an at once sorrowful and searching study of urban decay that speaks pointedly to America’s history of racial injustice.

Monday, October 3

Songs for Drella

Long thought lost, this elegiac concert documentary captures the extraordinary 1990 reunion of estranged Velvet Underground bandmates Lou Reed and John Cale. The occasion for this landmark event was a live performance of their album Songs for Drella, a wry and wrenching tribute to their recently deceased former manager Andy Warhol (the nickname, Drella, a portmanteau of Dracula and Cinderella, hints at the complex feelings the two men held for the artist, who exerted a Svengali-like influence over their early careers). Filmed with evocative austerity by renowned cinematographer Ed Lachman (The Virgin Suicides, Carol), Songs for Drella is both a mesmerizing musical experience and a haunting reflection on memory, loss, regret, and the search for solace.

Wednesday, October 5

Superior

Garnering comparisons to the work of David Lynch, Brian De Palma, and Pedro Almodóvar—yet undeniably on its own uncanny wavelength—the debut feature from Erin Vassilopoulos is a stylishly retro thriller tinged with surreal menace. On the run, Marian (Alessandra Mesa) goes to the only place she knows is safe: her childhood home. There, she is greeted by her estranged sister, Vivian (Ani Mesa), a stay-at-home housewife struggling to conceive and on the verge of a failing marriage. Though the two are identical twins, they live opposite lives. Marian’s mysterious return disrupts Vivian’s small-town routine, and the sisters must learn to reconnect and reconcile. When Marian’s haunted past finally catches up to her, their separate worlds collide, catapulting both sisters into grave danger.

Superior is presented with the short film of the same name that inspired it.

Criterion Collection Editions

Premiering October 1

Forty Guns: Criterion Collection Edition #954

Barbara Stanwyck saddles up with Samuel Fuller for this audacious pulp western that puts a boldly feminist spin on the genre.

SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: The feature-length documentary A Fuller Life, interviews with Fuller and critic Imogen Sara Smith, and more.

Deep Cover: Criterion Collection Edition #1086

Film noir hits the mean streets of 1990s Los Angeles in this stylish and subversive underworld odyssey from veteran actor-director Bill Duke.

SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: An interview with Duke; a conversation among Duke, actor Laurence Fishburne, and critic Elvis Mitchell; a conversation between film scholars Racquel J. Gates and Michael B. Gillespie; and more.

My Own Private Idaho: Criterion Collection Edition #277

River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves make an unforgettable screen pairing in Gus Van Sant’s haunting tale of life and love on the margins.

SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: An illustrated audio conversation between Van Sant and filmmaker Todd Haynes, a documentary on the making of the film, an interview with film scholar Paul Arthur, and more.

Women Filmmakers

Wednesday, October 12

Wolf’s Hole

Věra Chytilová’s subversive take on the 1980s teen horror movie is both a gonzo genre joyride and a blistering allegory for the psychic violence wrought by authoritarian oppression.

Wednesday, October 19

Near Dark

Kathryn Bigelow’s seductive breakout feature mixes moody art-house style with pulp pleasures to breathe fresh life into the vampire film.

Wednesday, October 26

 

Celia

The dark side of childhood imagination is conjured with exquisite eeriness in this unsettling evocation of innocence lost.

More women filmmakers featured in this month’s programming:

  • Three Documentaries by Marina Zenovich
  • The Velvet Vampire, Stephanie Rothman, 1971
  • The Slumber Party Massacre, Amy Holden Jones, 1982
  • Blood & Donuts, Holly Dale, 1995
  • The Headless Woman, Lucrecia Martel, 2009
  • The Black Case, Caroline Monnet and Daniel Watchorn, 2014
  • A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014
  • Everybody Dies!, Nuotama Bodomo, 2016
  • Swallowed, Lily Baldwin, 2016
  • Supergirl, Jessie Auritt, 2016
  • I Am Another You, Nanfu Wang, 2017
  • Hair Wolf, Mariama Diallo, 2018
  • White Echo, Chloë Sevigny, 2019
  • Hot Mother, Lucy Knox, 2020
  • Superior, Erin Vassilopoulos, 2021
  • Warsha, Dania Bdeir, 2022

Criterion Originals

Saturday, October 1

Spotlight on The Brood

In this installment of our Spotlight series, critic and author Grady Hendrix examines the potent blend of emotional anguish and body horror that David Cronenberg tapped into for one of his most terrifying classics.

Three Dimensions

Thursday, October 6

Three by Denis Villeneuve

The lauded French Canadian filmmaker behind the recent blockbuster sensation Dune, Denis Villeneuve started his career with a series of darkly funny, offbeat films laced with the intriguing science-fiction themes that would recur in much of his later work. Following a striking, technologically prescient contribution to the omnibus anthology Cosmos, Villeneuve made his feature directorial debut with August 32nd on Earth, an idiosyncratic existential drama that established him as one of Canadian cinema’s most vital new voices. Its follow-up, the audacious psychological fairy tale Maelström, is narrated by a fish with its head on a chopping block in a classically Villeneuvean touch of surprising surrealism.

  • Cosmos, 1996
  • August 32nd on Earth, 1998
  • Maelström, 2000

Saturday Matinees

Saturday, October 1

Little Miss Marker

Damon Runyon’s classic short story gets a sparkling screen update courtesy of an all-star cast let by Walter Matthau, Julie Andrews, and Tony Curtis.

Saturday, October 8

Invisible Essence: The Little Prince

Discover the unexpected story behind one of the most beloved books ever written.

Saturday, October 15

The Prisoner of Zenda

The most acclaimed of the many film adaptations of Anthony Hope’s classic adventure novel is a superbly mounted tale of political intrigue, mistaken identities, and swashbuckling heroics.

Saturday, October 22

Supergirl

This inspiring documentary traces a young powerlifter’s coming-of-age journey as she fights to hold on to her title while navigating the perils of adolescence.

Saturday, October 29

Life, Animated

The magic of Disney becomes a young autistic man’s lifeline in this powerfully honest and moving account of one family’s journey.

Short-Film Programs

October 1

Horror Shorts

Fear comes in all forms in this selection of dread-inducing shorts. Featuring unsettling early works by masters of menace like David Lynch (The Alphabet) and Guillermo del Toro (Geometria) as well as innovative contemporary films that use horror to confront issues such as racism (Hair Wolf) and cultural genocide (The Black Case), these macabre miniatures may only last minutes, but they will haunt your psyche for much longer.

  • The Alphabet, David Lynch, 1968
  • Geometria, Guillermo del Toro, 1987
  • The Black Case, Caroline Monnet and Daniel Watchorn, 2014
  • Sea Devil, Dean C. Marcial and Brett Potter, 2014
  • Everybody Dies!, Nuotama Bodomo, 2016
  • Swallowed, Lily Baldwin, 2016
  • The Beaning, Sean McCoy, 2017
  • Hair Wolf, Mariama Diallo, 2018
  • The Devil’s Harmony, Dylan Holmes Williams, 2019
  • The Fall, Jonathan Glazer, 2019
  • White Echo, Chloë Sevigny, 2019

Tuesday, October 4th

Start Your Engines!

Sierra and The Great Race

Get revved up for a pair of epic car races in a neon-surreal animated odyssey and an exuberant slapstick delight.

Tuesday, October 11th

Warsha

Queer alienation gives way to an ecstatic experience of liberation in Dania Bdeir’s dazzlingly conceived short, a Sundance prizewinner.

Tuesday, October 18th

Mama Drama

Hot Mother and Autumn Sonata

The often frayed bonds between parents and children are put under the microscope in these intense, claustrophobic portraits of extremely troubled mother-daughter relationships.

Tuesday, October 25th

Beware Big Brother

The Criminals and The Ear

Two politically charged thrillers bristling with unseen menace evoke the ever-present sense of dread that underpins life in an authoritarian surveillance state.

True Stories

Monday, October 10

Three Documentaries by Marina Zenovich

Specializing in portraits of powerful and often controversial figures, Marina Zenovich (Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind, Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired) began her career with these three idiosyncratic documentaries, which range from a candid look at the struggles of American independent filmmakers in the 1990s (Independent’s Day) to a self-reflexive exploration of her own fascination with a French politician turned convicted criminal turned actor (Who Is Bernard Tapie?) to an offbeat portrait of Tallinn, Estonia, as it prepares to host the Eurovision Song Contest (Estonia Dreams of Eurovision!).

  • Independent’s Day, 1997
  • Who Is Bernard Tapie?, 2001
  • Estonia Dreams of Eurovision!, 2003

Monday, October 17

I Am Another You

Chinese filmmaker Nanfu Wang explores the limits of America’s rugged individualism in this troubling portrait of a young drifter who has turned his back on society.

Monday, October 24

Dries

With this exquisite fashion documentary, legendary designer Dries Van Noten offers an intimate look into his intricate creative process and rich home life.

Monday, October 31

Haxan: Criterion Collection Edition No. 134

Benjamin Christensen’s legendary treatise on the history of witchcraft is a satanic brew of the scary, the gross, and the darkly humorous.

SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: Audio commentary by film scholar Casper Tybjerg; Witchcraft Through the Ages (1968), a seventy-six-minute version of Häxan narrated by author William S. Burroughs; and more.

More documentaries featured in this month’s programming:

  • Songs for Drella, Ed Lachman, 1990
  • still/here, Christopher Harris, 2000
  • Life, Animated, Roger Ross Williams, 2016
  • Supergirl, Jessie Auritt, 2016
  • Invisible Essence: The Little Prince, Charles Officer, 2018

Double Features

Friday, October 7

A 100th Annoirversary

Panic in the Streets and Caught

In her centennial month, the feisty, perpetually underrated Barbara Bel Geddes shines in a pair of tense, atmospheric noir classics from Elia Kazan and Max Ophüls.

Friday, October 14

Down for the Count

Dracula and Blacula

The ultimate vampire classic is paired with a subversive blaxploitation update in this twice-bitten double feature.

Friday, October 21

Slime Time

The Blob (1958) and The Blob (1988)

The gelatinous terror strikes and strikes again in the 1950s drive-in classic and its impressively gory Reagan-era remake.

Friday, October 28

Double Feature: It’s Alive!

Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s fabled monster unleashes mayhem in a Universal horror classic and its wickedly witty sequel.

… And More Spooks!

Hush … Hush, Sweet Charlotte

Bette Davis goes gloriously over-the-top batty in her and director Robert Aldrich’s follow-up to What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, a gothic melodrama overloaded with creepy swamp-water atmosphere, severed limbs, and high-camp histrionics.

The House of the Devil

Director Ti West tips his hat to the slasher classics of the 1970s and ’80s with this intense, stylishly retro satanic shocker.

Island of Lost Souls: Criterion Collection Edition #586

Charles Laughton and Bela Lugosi star in this twisted H. G. Wells tale of science run amok from Hollywood’s pre-Code horror heyday.

SUPPLEMENTAL FEATURES: Audio commentary by film historian Gregory Mank; a conversation among filmmaker John Landis, makeup artist Rick Baker, and genre expert Bob Burns; and more.

Complete list of films premiering on the Criterion Channel this month:

  • Atragon, Ishiro Honda, 1963
  • August 32nd on Earth, Denis Villeneuve, 1998
  • Basket Case, Frank Henenlotter, 1982
  • Black Book, Paul Verhoeven, 2006
  • The Black Cat, Edgar G. Ulmer, 1934
  • Blackenstein, William A. Levey, 1973
  • Blacula, William Crain, 1972
  • The Blob, Chuck Russell, 1988
  • Blood & Donuts, Holly Dale, 1995*
  • Blood and Sand, Rouben Mamoulian, 1941
  • Brain Damage, Frank Henenlotter, 1988
  • Bride of Frankenstein, James Whale, 1935
  • Cat People, Paul Schrader, 1982
  • Caught, Max Ophuls, 1949*
  • Celia, Ann Turner, 1989
  • Cosmos, Marie-Julie Dallaire, Manon Briand, Jennifer Alleyn, Arto Paragamian, André Turpin, and Denis Villeneuve, 1996
  • Creature from the Black Lagoon, Jack Arnold, 1954
  • The Criminals, Serhat Karaaslan, 2020
  • Dead & Buried, Gary Sherman, 1981
  • Deep Cover, Bill Duke, 1992
  • Dogora, Ishiro Honda, 1964
  • Dracula, Tod Browning, 1931
  • Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary, Guy Maddin, 2002
  • Dracula (Spanish-language version), George Melford, 1931
  • Dream Demon, Harley Cokeliss, 1988
  • Dries, Reiner Holzemer, 2017
  • Estonia Dreams of Eurovision!, Marina Zenovich, 2002
  • The Fan, Edward Bianchi, 1981
  • Fascination, Jean Rollin, 1979
  • Forty Guns, Samuel Fuller, 1957
  • Frankenstein, James Whale, 1931
  • Frankenstein vs. Baragon, Ishiro Honda, 1965
  • The Funhouse, Tobe Hooper, 1981
  • A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014
  • The Headless Woman, Lucrecia Martel, 2008
  • Heroin, Jessica Beshir, 2017
  • He Who Dances on Wood, Jessica Beshir, 2016
  • The Hidden, Jack Sholder, 1987
  • Hot Mother, Lucy Knox, 2020
  • The House by the Cemetery, Lucio Fulci, 1981
  • The House of the Devil, Ti West, 2009
  • Hush … Hush, Sweet Charlotte, Robert Aldrich, 1964
  • I Am Another You, Nanfu Wang, 2017
  • Independent’s Day, Marina Zenovich, 1997
  • Inferno, Dario Argento, 1980
  • Invisible Essence: The Little Prince, Charles Officer, 2018*
  • The Invisible Man, James Whale, 1933
  • Island of Lost Souls, Erle C. Kenton, 1932
  • Isle of the Dead, Mark Robson, 1945
  • The Keep, Michael Mann, 1983
  • Lady in a Cage, Walter Grauman, 1964
  • The Lair of the White Worm, Ken Russell, 1988
  • Let the Right One In, Tomas Alfredson, 2008*
  • Life, Animated, Roger Ross Williams, 2016
  • The Living Dead Girl, Jean Rollin, 1982
  • Maelström, Denis Villeneuve, 2000
  • Matango, Ishiro Honda, 1963
  • The Mummy, Karl Freund, 1932
  • The Mysterians, Ishiro Honda, 1957
  • My Own Private Idaho, Gus Van Sant, 1991
  • Near Dark, Kathryn Bigelow, 1987
  • Next of Kin, Tony Williams, 1982
  • Nosferatu the Vampyre, Werner Herzog, 1979
  • Panic in the Streets, Elia Kazan, 1950
  • Performance, Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg, 1970
  • Prince of Darkness, John Carpenter, 1987
  • Q: The Winged Serpent, Larry Cohen, 1982
  • The Raven, Lew Landers, 1935
  • Road Games, Richard Franklin, 1981
  • Sierra, Sander Joon, 2022
  • Slumber Party Massacre, Amy Holden Jones, 1982
  • Society, Brian Yuzna, 1989
  • Songs for Drella, Ed Lachman, 1990
  • Sounder, Martin Ritt, 1972
  • Space Amoeba, Ishiro Honda, 1970
  • still/here, Vlad Feier, 2020
  • Strange Behavior, Michael Laughlin, 1981
  • The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Miss Osbourne, Walerian Borowczyk, 1981
  • Supergirl, Jessie Auritt, 1984
  • Superior, Erin Vassilopoulos, 2021
  • Superior, Erin Vassilopoulos, 2015
  • Tetsuo: The Iron Man, Shinya Tsukamoto, 1989
  • Thirst, Park Chan-wook, 2009
  • Vampire’s Kiss, Robert Bierman, 1989
  • Varan the Unbelievable, Ishiro Honda, 1958
  • The Velvet Vampire, Stephanie Rothman, 1971
  • Vive L’Amour, Tsai Ming-liang, 1994
  • Warsha, Dania Bdeir, 2022
  • White of the Eye, Donald Cammell, 1987
  • Who Is Bernard Tapie?, Marina Zenovich, 2001
  • Wolfen, Michael Wadleigh, 1981
  • The Wolf Man, George Waggner

*Available in the U.S. only

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